Gotham Diabetic Management Approach Compared To Johns Hopkins

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Gotham Diabetic Management Approach Compared To Johns Hopkins

The Johns Hopkins Comprehensive Diabetes Center offers diagnosis, assessment, education, management and multidisciplinary care. The Hospital has specialists from the Wilmer Eye Institute, cardiology division, obstetrics division and the Children’s Center, communicating with patients’ primary care-givers, and work with their insurance carriers (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2012).

The Johns Hopkins Inpatient Diabetes Management Service (IDMS) was first implemented on July 1, 2003 as a pilot diabetes clinical consultation service to improve glucose control and reduce length of stay in diabetes patients undergoing cardiac surgery. For the first year of the program, length of stay on cardiac surgery patients with diabetes seen by the service was reduced by 58%. The service was expanded to other clinical services throughout the hospital. In January 2006, a hospital-wide Glucose Control Task Force (GCTF) was commissioned in response to a sentinel event related to hypoglycemia and the clinical service became an integral part of the hospital-wide GCTF (Johns Hopkins Medicine, 2012).

The Diabetes Center at Hopkins offers appointments to individuals to meet with a nurse practitioner or dietician certified diabetes educator on one-on-one basis. Again, group education programs are offered which include2-hour, 1-day and a 2-day program on nutrition, survival skills for diabetes, and a comprehensive diabetes education respectively. At the end of each program a certificate is issued to participants. These programs help people learn more about diabetes and take critical steps towards taking control of their disease. All facets of care including access to specialists in ophthalmology, cardiology, obstetrics and pediatrics are offered by the center (John Hopkins Medicine, 2012). [A chart comparing all these data would be useful]

In comparison, both Gotham hospital and John Hopkins share similar diabetes management programs both for inpatient/outpatient and community-based programs but one outstanding feature of John Hopkins’ program has to do with the education program that it offers. It is like a whole class organized at the hospital premises to educate the patients on how to take control of their disease. Though Gotham organizes educational programs but it is not as a class, rather it sends representatives to each Gotham associated Center to educate both inpatients and outpatients but not in a group class format with certificates awarded as in John Hopkins. However it is interesting to note that outcome in terms of most diabetes disease measure is similar in both hospitals and both hospitals serve similar demographics. [So are you suggesting a different format? It seems that the participation is low and if you “centralize” the “classes” vs. being out in several locations in the community that the participation will decrease].

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